put-that-away-lauren:

Mayday Parade at Warped Tour 2012.

me last year at Warped <3 10(ish) more days <3 

put-that-away-lauren:

Mayday Parade at Warped Tour 2012.

me last year at Warped <3 10(ish) more days <3 


Early light by Joel Faviere on Flickr.

Early light by Joel Faviere on Flickr.


Depression

Some people think we know everything about depression. But the reality is we don’t know a lot about depression, because depression is different for everyone. For me, depression is stuff like unexplained sadness, suicidal thoughts, fatigue. For other people it might be sleeping a lot, mood swings, pain in muscles. It differs from person to person. The best way to handle a loved one with depression is to know that you don’t understand completly. The only thing you can do is support the depressed person and let them know your there. Don’t let them just sit in their room alone. Don’t go days with out talking to them. Talk to them often and check on them often because it makes them feel like they have your attention, love, and support. If you notice that you or someone you love is showing symptoms of depression (fatigue, extreme weight change, little or too much sleep, body pain, suicidal thoughts, isolation, constant sadness, irritablity, unexplained worthlessness or guilt, hopelessness) the best thing to do is to get a doctor or psychiatrist help immediately. They are professionals and will know how to treat this better than you will on your own. Not seeing a doctor is one of the most dangerous things you can do. There is one symptom that is very serious and requires immediate attention and that is suicidal thoughts. If you or someone you love has suicidal thoughts you need to get help right away. There are many ways to get help. There are suicidal hotlines like 1-800-273-8255 and there are websites like http://www.twloha.com/ and http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ that connect people to help. Often a response when someone says they are depressed is, “Be happy.” What people don’t realize is that there is a chemical inbalance that is making it so the person can not be happy. Depression is just a serious as diabetes or other physical illnesses. But people can’t see it so they aren’t faced with the reality that it is there. Depression is a serious mental illness but with help from a doctor and support it can get better.


Like Moths To Flames by Christofer Blincoe on Flickr.Like Moths To Flames

Like Moths To Flames by Christofer Blincoe on Flickr.

Like Moths To Flames


I hope you wake u[p and see this lovely face. Beans Motherfucker.

(via put-that-away-lauren)


I miss my blue hair so. much. :,(

I miss my blue hair so. much. :,(


"Ew, that person must be Anorexic or Bulimic." "It’s actually called Anorexia Nervosa or Bulimia Nervosa……"

So what…? Whats the difference between “Anorexia”, and “Anorexia Nervosa”? Or “Bulimia” and “Bulimia Nervosa”? The truth is, there is no difference, people just commonly refer to “Anorexia Nervosa” as “Anorexia” and “Bulimia Nervosa” as “Bulimia”. They leave out the “Nervosa” in the diseases name. Which, is a big mistake. You see, the word “Nervosa” helps describe the disease. When used to describe a disease, the word “Nervosa” means that the disease originates in the brain. This may not seem like a huge deal but, a lot of people don’t know this. They just think that a person is starving themself or making themself throw up because they want to be skinny. The actuality is, that “Anorexia Nervosa” and “Bulimia Nervosa” are commonly a result of a deeper Psychological problem like: low self esteem, past or current sexual/verbal/physical abuse, Depression, Anxiety, or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. So while most people think that a person is throwing up or starving themself because they want to be skinny, they are actually throwing up because something in their mind is telling them they HAVE TO. They don’t have a choice, their brain is telling them they have to. So what can we do now? We can treat “Anorexia Nervosa” and “Bulimia Nervosa” as it needs to be treated. We need to treat these diseases just like any other mental disease. Next time you think,” Look at that Anorexic girl.” Try to sympathize a little and understand that what that person is going through is a little more complicated and a lot harder to deal with than you think. Use sympathy to become a part of the solution, not the problem.